TECFIDERA effectiveness

Understanding the potential benefits of Tecfidera® (dimethyl fumarate)

In separate 2-year clinical studies, TECFIDERA was tested against a placebo, or "fake" pill—a standard way to measure if a drug works as expected. 

TECFIDERA was shown to be effective in the 3 goals of relapsing MS treatment

TECFIDERA was shown to be effective in the 3 goals of relapsing MS treatment

*In a 2-year study, TECFIDERA reduced risk of relapse by 49% compared with placebo. See more below.

Cut relapses

Cut relapses in half

Relapses, also called flare-ups or exacerbations, can be disruptive. Reducing the risk of relapses should be one of the goals of treatment.

Although no relapsing MS medication completely gets rid of relapses, TECFIDERA cut them in half when compared with placebo.

In TECFIDERA studies, TECFIDERA was shown to cut risk of relapses in half

In a 2-year study, 27% of people
taking TECFIDERA had a
relapse, compared with
46% taking placebo.

TECFIDERA CUT THE
RISK OF RELAPSES
IN HALF

In another 2-year study, 29% of people
taking TECFIDERA had a relapse,
compared with 41% taking placebo.

In TECFIDERA studies, TECFIDERA was shown to cut number of relapses in half

In a 2-year study, TECFIDERA
cut the number of relapses
by 44% compared
with placebo.

TECFIDERA CUT THE
NUMBER OF RELAPSES
BY NEARLY HALF

In another 2-year study, TECFIDERA cut
the number of relapses by 53%
compared with placebo.

Cut relapsesDelay the progression of physical disability

Delay the progression of physical disability

When you have relapsing MS, you know how important it is to stay as active and mobile as you possibly can.

In a 2-year clinical study, TECFIDERA was shown to delay the progression of physical disability, which is an important goal of treatment.  

People taking TECFIDERA were 38% less likely to experience physical disability progression compared with those taking placebo

8 out of 10 people taking TECFIDERA had no disability progression compared with 7 out of 10 people taking placebo.

Slow the development of brain lesions

Slow the development of brain lesions

The link between brain lesions and the progression of MS has not been confirmed. However, brain lesions can happen without you feeling them, and may be a sign that the disease is active. Lesions revealed on an MRI scan may help your healthcare professional determine how well your treatment is working. Talking to your healthcare professional about the results of your MRI could help with the management of your relapsing MS.

TECFIDERA slowed the development of brain lesions in a 2-year study

To understand the impact of TECFIDERA on brain lesions, researchers looked at lesions using 3 different MRI techniques to determine the age and stage of the lesions. Based on all 3 measures, people taking TECFIDERA had fewer lesions compared with those taking placebo.

The lesions studied showed:

ACTIVE INFLAMMATION

(Average number of Gd+
lesions at 2 years)

1.8

Placebo

0.1

Tecfidera

Gd+ lesions:
Inflamed brain tissue that is attacked and considered “active.” These lesions disappear when inflammation decreases.

Clinical trial results

90% fewer Gd+ lesions for TECFIDERA

LONG-TERM IMPACT OF INFLAMMATION

(Average number of new or newly enlarging T2 lesions over 2 years)

17.0

Placebo

2.6

Tecfidera

T2 lesions:
Scars that indicate the long-term impact of MS on the brain. They can either be new lesions or old lesions that develop again.

Clinical trial results

85% fewer T2 lesions for TECFIDERA

POSSIBLE
PERMANENT DAMAGE

(Average number of new
T1 lesions over 2 years)

5.6

Placebo

1.5

Tecfidera

T1 lesions:
Nerve cells in the brain that can’t be repaired, which can mean a loss of function.

Clinical trial results

72% fewer T1 lesions for TECFIDERA

How TECFIDERA is thought to work

It is not known exactly how TECFIDERA works in the body, but researchers have discovered information about what it does inside the cells.

Oxidative Stress

During inflammation, the body produces toxins that can cause oxidative stress on the cells. When this stress builds up, it can damage or even destroy healthy cells in different parts of the body, including the central nervous system (CNS).

Nrf2 Pathway

One way the body reacts to oxidative stress is through a pathway called Nrf2, short for nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2. This pathway is an important part of a complex communication system involved in the body's response to oxidative stress.

Dimethyl Fumarate

Researchers have learned that dimethyl fumarate leads to activation of the Nrf2 pathway in our cells. Much about how TECFIDERA works in the body remains unknown, but talking with your doctor can help you learn more about your treatment options.